Improve internal Sales Communication

"Going Great" and Other BS Sales Reps Say Sometimes

Improve internal Sales Communication

If you’ve got sales reps working for you (really, if you’ve got anyone working for you), and you’re getting all the accurate information from them that you need, when you need it, then read no further. If you need any more accurate information than you’re getting, when you need it, read on.

 

A SALES TEAM PROBLEM

Engaged and high-performing sales VPs and sales managers are telling me about a problem they’re having with their reps. “My reps aren’t communicating well with me. And sales cycles are too long.” Sound familiar?

Maybe broken communication and too-long sales cycles sound like two problems, not one. I’m combining them because solving internal communication problems can shorten sales cycles. And the same fears that prevent communication also interfere in sales relationships and prohibit rapport building.

Fear of uncertainty leads to vague, unproductive communication.

BREAKDOWN 1

You ask your rep, “Rep, how’s it going with the Smith & Co. account?” Your rep smiles and replies, “It’s going great.”

Best case scenario, you and Rep are on the same page about what “great” means. Progress is happening swiftly. Prospect is eagerly moving through the buying process. Commitment leads to commitment, and a signed contract is on the way. And Prospect has been qualified as good a fit for you as you are for them.

But what if “great” means something different to the rep than it means to you? To you, “great” means the deal is making distinct and swift progress down the pipeline. To Rep, maybe “great” means that this difficult and demanding prospect hasn’t been making demands this week. That’s easier on Rep, but could actually be a sign of a stall.

Worst case scenario, but a very common one, “great” is not actually in any way related to the deal. It’s a default response. Like, “How are you doing?” and “fine.” It’s just an effective way Rep has found to end the conversation with you, the supervisor, “so I can get back to work.” It’s a method reps use to avoid looking bad in front of supervisors. Rep doesn’t have to face your disappointment or their own if everybody accepts “great” as an acceptable response.

BREAKDOWN 2

You ask your rep when the Acme Ltd deal is going to close. Rep replies, “By month end.” But the deal doesn’t close by month end. Was Rep simply mistaken? Did something unexpected and unpredictable come up, or was the roadblock expected and predictable? Or, did Rep knowingly promise you a pipe-dream in order to delay delivering bad news they knew was coming?

Well meaning reps, even high-performing ones, often dodge, delay, defer effective internal communication. “If I report green, and then bust my butt, I’ll get this account to green before it hits the fan. Everything will be cool. I’ll make sure it becomes cool. No one will have to know that there was ever a problem.”

BREAKDOWN 3

You ask Rep about the pending Anonymous & Associates deal, and Rep says, “They asked me to check back next fiscal year.”

You say, “I thought the contract was a done deal, all but signed.”

“Yeah.” Rep says, “I thought so too. They changed their mind.” You ask what happened. Rep bows her head. She tells you about a blunder she made on a sales call last month, putting her foot in her mouth. She apologized at the time, but the whole tenor of the relationship changed. And she just couldn’t pull the deal out of the resulting nose dive. If Rep had only come to you immediately, you know you could have helped mend the damage done, and come out ahead. If only Rep had told you at the time.

A SALES TEAM SITUATION

Your job as a sales team leader is to increase revenues, to improve systems and strategies, and the get ever greater results from the resources at hand. It’s a sales-team leader’s job to get more this year out of well-meaning reps who are doing good work than we got last year.

Many people in your role, however, struggle to get the granular, specific information they need to assess, project, and support. Sales Directors say they’re learning about problems in the pipeline later than they wish. If I’d known earlier,” they mourn, “I could have helped. And my projections would have been more accurate.”

And when sales reps project a front that, “It’s all good,” it can be difficult to assess where they need coaching, and to support them in advancing their skill and to improve their results.

Does this sound like your life? Do the well-meaning (even high-performing) reps on your team keep information to themselves when it would serve the company (and themselves) better if they’d share it?

You need a collaboration boost.

 

AN ADEPTABLE SALES PERSPECTIVE

That’s why I want improvisers on my sales team. It’s not just that their presence and focus on others create great relationships with prospects that convert them to clients, keep them coming back, increase referral business, and generate gratitude (as described in an earlier blog post). They’re a part of an open system of information that allows the whole organization to thrive, improve, and succeed.

Teams trained to improvise (in programs like Adeptability Training) have more fluid and open information flow — and thus they’re more adaptive, more responsive, and more effective collaborators. Improvisers share information — even information that shows their vulnerabilities — freely and frequently. Sharing information is how they get ahead.

Even before Adeptability Training, you can start to practice its principles today. At your next sales-team meeting, coach your team to put this one into practice. We call this principle “Be Obvious.”


A SOLUTION

Ask your team to “Be Obvious” with you. Tell them, “Nothing goes without saying.”

People who practice “Be Obvious” say more about more. You can ask for more information — and get it — by saying, “Nothing’s too obvious to tell me.” And you, as a supervisor, can be obvious right back. When Rep tells you, “Everything’s great with Smith & Company,” you can say, “I don’t know what ‘great’ means in this circumstance. Tell me more.”

This only works if you tell them as well, “When you come to me early with a problem, I will have your back.” Provide them with the coaching, the support, and the resources they need to excel. Sales reps thrive with support, and faith, and freedom. Most of us in sales are relational types. We may have lone-wolf tendencies, but we get a lot from the relationships that nurture us.

Make a game of it. You might say, “I know this might be obvious, but…” and then say what you think no-one should miss. “I know this might be obvious, but…” and then ask the question whose answer may be obvious. “I know this might be obvious, but have you asked Prospect this question.”

Ridiculing people for being “Captain Obvious” is a common thing in the culture at large, and in many company cultures as well.

“Be Obvious” culture, however, is far more effective. And with a little practice, feedback, and having fun with it, “Be Obvious” can easily be installed within a few weeks.

You’ll never go back.

When your reps are “obvious” with you, you’ll suddenly have three times the opportunities to provide coaching inside the sales process. With more information flow, you can close more business and fine-tune your sales process to truly respond to the particulars of your business, your product, and your clients.

As you repeatedly ask for more information, your reps will learn that vagueness won’t fly. They’ll stop saying, “Going great,” and they’ll actually start giving you details before you have to ask for them.

BONUS ADEPTABLE TOOL

Be Specific.

Ask your team to give you more specifics, greater detail — as a rule. This principle walks hand-in-hand with “Be Obvious.”

The tough part for you… Have the patience to keep asking. Dig into the details, and don’t take “fine” for an answer. Be kind. Be patient. Keep at it. The folks on your team will become fonts of specific information you can use to shepherd deals, notice skill gaps, give an assist, and coach effectively.

Your team will thrive. You will exceed objectives.

 

TRAINING VS. INSTRUCTION

I make a distinction between training and instruction. Instruction provides information. It takes considerable work to implement. You’ve got to bring considerable, deliberate attention to bear.

Training is experiential and creates habit. Once trained, people behave as trained by default.

 

If this sounds useful, book a call. We’ll help make it easier to keep the information flowing on your team.


Powerful Networking Approach for Sales - And for Everything Else

I’ve learned some things about networking in recent years that I wish I’d known a long time ago.

LOST OPPORTUNITY

If I’d known 20 years ago, I’d be rich now, and my work-life (which I’ve liked) would have been more fulfilling. Networking is different from prospecting. (And, by the way, even my prospecting looks more now like networking than simply looking for business.)

When I go to a networking event, I hope I’ll meet people with whom I’ll be able to do business. Doing business is how I eat. Most people “do networking” from within that hope. And they hate networking. And therefore, networking doesn’t work for most people like it works for those few high performers who seem to close business out of nowhere without breaking a sweat.

I used to suck at networking. I didn’t understand that in order to be effective, networking must be separate from the hope that it’ll lead to business.

We’re told, “add value,” and, “just meet people.” We’re told, “Ask people about themselves.” We’re admonished, “Don’t be pushy.” And, “Be authentic, genuine.” Almost nobody tells us how, or even what those things mean. They don’t tell us that when we try to be authentic, the trying prohibits authenticity.

We don’t know that when we speak with people while holding a specific hope, we come off desperate and turn people off. In fact, many of your sales managers push you to close sales in a way that breeds feelings of desperation and prevents you from building rapport and closing business. No one tells us what to do with the profound desire to get business and make money.

THE HIGH PERFORMER’S DIFFERENCE

The highest performers are driven by the desire to make money, and they don’t allow that desire to co-opt their conversations. Their conversations are about people, and about being of help. Their conversations are not about how they’ll make quota.

The key is to step aside from hope when talking with others — whether in a sales conversation or simply networking. You can hope, of course. Don’t let me take that away from you. Heck, you can’t help it. To hope is human. Just let hope be a passenger, not a driver. You may have heard the adage, “Hope is not a strategy.” Hope isn’t a healthy relationship driver either.

Drive your networking and your connecting instead with faith. Hope is specific. I hope you like me. I hope you’re a good prospect for me. I hope we can do business. I really hope I leave this event with at least one strong lead. It’s pretty easy to have your hopes dashed. So it’s pretty easy to come across as desperate or manipulative — salesy — as you pursue your hopes.

Faith is more general. It’s not so easily dashed. I have faith that if I do the right things, I’ll be successful. I have faith that if I help whomever is in front of me, some people I help will want what I sell, and want it from me. I have faith that I’ll close deals, even if I don’t close the particular deal in front of me now. I have faith that the deals I do close will be with the right people for the right reasons at the right time.

The profound connections I make with people through that authentic, calm, confident standpoint will lead to more business. When I do go to close the deal, with faith as my context, I’ll close because it’s the best way to help the prospect, not because I need the sale.


A STORY

This morning, Thomas Tomasevic, an accountability buddy of mine asked, “How was the networking event you went to last night?”

I spent two hours in a large room full of business people and left without a single substantial lead. I did not gain even one prospect who’s likely to ever buy the training packages that are my bread and butter.

It was one of the absolute best nights of networking of my life.

I told Thomas about every substantial conversation I had last night. Here, edited just a bit for clarity, is the email I sent him recounting my great success. (In parenthesis below, is a bit of commentary I’m adding now.)

8 STRATEGIES TO POWER-UP YOUR NETWORKING

What I did all in one very fruitful evening:

1. Remember people who aren’t there.

I met two people who mentioned they do business with maritime clients – I’m connecting them with an excellent maritime photographer I know. (That adds value to the people I met since they can refer their clients to a resource. It adds value to photographer Mihael Blikshteyn because he may get business through my recommendation.)

2. Compliment people where you see strengths they don’t.

One of the people I’m connecting with Mihael is an attorney who feels she is, “not good with people…” But she can be. Based on my experience — she was good with me — I told her, “You’re better with people than you think.” (I was being honest. She could sense that. That adds value to her by starting to replace a limiting belief that she told me hampers her ability to attract new business.)

3. Your network is like your brain. It’s not just about making new connections. Strengthen existing ones too.

I ran into at least five people I already knew and deepened those connections: I impressed one with the value I gave to someone else by shifting her perspective and offering to help with a problem she was facing. I promised another person whose services I’d used that I’d make a LinkedIn recommendation of praise I’d emailed to him privately. With another, I talked about valuable sources of content online, and we traded valuable business boosting resources. The fourth, I smiled at, shook his hand, and told him I’d missed him at the last Wednesday morning meeting we both frequently attend. With the fifth, I asked if he’d done business with a lead I’d sent his way that wasn’t a fit for my company, and asked if there was anything I could do to help with that lead.

4. Trite as it is, look for the win-win (and the win-win-win).

I met the corporate giving manager of a major Seattle theater, and started the relationship off strong. I shared with her my passion for theater, and agreed to mention her and her theater to leaders I meet who care about the arts. She agreed to send me podcast guests for “Mighty Good Work“. (That’s good for both of us. By introducing them to me, her donors get a free platform to tell their stories. I get a shortcut to creating the content my listeners want, and I expand the network of leaders I’m connected to.)

This was her first Seattle Chamber event, and she asked me if I thought they’d be useful to her. I gave her some counsel about how to approach choosing which events to attend and how to meet the C-Suite folks in the crowd who can help her expand her network of leaders and grow her donor base.

5. Make promises that you will later keep. Think long term.

I met a young guy from Boeing whose job I didn’t understand. He gave me some insight about selling into Boeing. He’s going to be looking for a new position, and I told him to reach out when he starts. (I’ll gladly help him land in a great situation for him. I’m glad to know a little more about how to succeed in pitching Boeing.)

6. People love help. They love to give it. They love to get it. Create relationships between others where there’s no direct benefit to you.

I met a young woman who’s a financial advisor. I helped her shift her thinking about sales from, “I must convince them,” to, “I must simply support and offer expertise – educating without judgment.” She’ll grow her business by being valuable, gaining trust, and building rapport without raising people’s defenses. She heaved a sigh of relief to have a new, more authentic way of thinking about sales. I learned she’s feeling daunted and lonely in the male dominant field. I promised to connect her with a dynamic woman who’s an experienced veteran in the same industry who will enjoy being a mentor to her. (This connection is already made, and they are both grateful for the opportunity to get to know one another. They’ll be talking in a few days.)

7. Help build others’ businesses.

The venue this event was held in had a unique character – I sought out the event sales person for the venue, and promised to connect her with a significant Seattle event planner I know who’s never held an event there, but who will appreciate the character of the venue. (Both the venue and the event planner will derive value — one gets new business. The other has new inventory to offer her clients that’s unique in the marketplace.)

8. Recognize opportunity.

The manager of programs and partnerships at the Seattle Chamber saw me in passing, and I smiled and said, “Hi!” Unprompted, she promised to call me next month. She’d like to have me give a presentation or two at upcoming chamber events.


[mk_image src=”https://www.theyesworks.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/meeting-web-e1476228228525.png” image_size=”full”]

A PERSPECTIVE

I’m likely to get no business directly from any of the connections I made last night. Even so, I view it as one of my most successful nights of networking. I didn’t change the world. Not their worlds, and not mine.

A different KPI

And… The number of people upon whom I made a positive impression… The number of people for whom I made a notable difference… That’s the KPI by which I’m measuring my success and giving my performance full marks. I’m still trying to give value as a result of the evening. You may have noticed all the links in this post helping you find the people I met.

All connections are good connections. They’re all promising connections. You never know what’ll come of the seeds of goodwill sewn indiscriminately.

And, I had fun. I felt very few moments of self-consciousness all night.

Escape Self-Consciousness

Some people are very self-conscious about networking, about approaching strangers, about telling people what they do, and about asking for business. Until recently, I was self-conscious about all that.

The opposite of self-conscious is you-conscious. Be conscious of the other person and how you can help them. It’s an easier approach, free of self-consciousness, if you begin each encounter with the thought, “Who are you? How can I help?”

Cultivate Gratitude

There’s a reason a book entitled The Go Giver is so popular among top performers. Gratitude is a currency.

Are you building and banking gratitude in your network? What shifts do you need to make to your expectations and intentions around networking in order to enjoy it more and to provide more value? Are you approaching your business relationships from an improviser’s mentality — where your plan is specific enough to drive your behavior, and open enough to accommodate serendipity and allow you to recognize subtle opportunities?

Resolve to put some gratitude in the bank today, and tomorrow. And tomorrow.


I.T. That Adds Value with Gina Harris - MGW #7

GUEST: Gina Harris

Director of Information Technology at TalkingRain Beverage Company

https://www.linkedin.com/in/ginatharris?trk=miniprofile-photo

http://www.talkingrain.com/

 

IT is just taking orders, fixing passwords, coding and explaining complex technical issues to those who don’t speak tech, right?  Not if you are Gina Harris, from Talking Rain.  IT is about viewing and treating people as change agents that require a whole business point of view.

 

Gina speaks to the necessity of fostering business knowledge as an IT professional in sales, negotiation, optimization of supply chain, assessing people’s brilliance and automating work-flow, vendor relations, and risk management.

 

Her advice, “Understand the business.  Look at it from a 50,000 ft view. Look at how we make money.  How we produce the goods we sell.  Find out what that is all about.  And then work down from the 40,000 ft, to the 30,000 ft, the 20,000 ft and understand who the players are. Who the influencers are?What the potential is to differentiate us from our competition.  Really, it is ‘know the business,’ once you know the business, the IT part is a lot easier.”

 

She shares that having a Learning Organization is essential to her company’s overall success.

 

How do you ensure you have a Learning Organization?

 

  1.    Empower your team with information.  Paint the picture of the problem, brainstorm, research and collaborate the solution together.
  2.    Soft skills are more important than your tech skills.
  3.     Ability to embrace change.
  4.    Being open minded
  5.     Initiative
  6.    Empathy
  7.    Self Awareness
  8.      Willing to Collaborate
  9.    Thick Skinned- Don’t take rejection personally, find out what you could do better.
  10.    Team Building
  11.     Have each other’s back
  12.    Humor
  13.     No one says, “this is not my job”
  14.    Speak to strengths and weaknesses
  15.    Give credit and appreciate people’s skills
  16.    Compassion & Empathy translates into Good Work
  17.     When you treat people well, give them feedback and look them in the eye on a regular basis, they will rally behind the leadership if they feel supported.

 

Thank you, Gina, for your transparent and informed advice on how to generate mighty good work as an IT pro and company wide.

 

Visit Mighty Good Work and The Yes Works at: www.TheYesWorks.com

 

Found out more great info from Gina in this article: http://food.cioreview.com/cxoinsight/the-business-value-of-it–nid-14037-cid-29.html

 

Theme music by: Miguel Juarez

 

Midshow break music by : Allan Loucks www.TinEar.com
Check out this episode!


Make a friend. Almost kill him. Start a business together.

I made a new friend. One day, we almost killed each other. Then, we spent that afternoon together in misery. Next, we formed a company to teach others to do what we had done — at work. You can do it too at your work.

I’m getting ahead of myself.

Meeting:

Adam and I worked together once, years ago, on a project for two months. It was great. Won some critical acclaim. Was beloved by a small number of fans. And ultimately, it failed commercially. Some time later, we entered a competition together (along with some others) with a weekends’ project, had some fun, and won an award. I liked working with Adam. I thought there was potential for a friendship there, so I asked him on an adventure.

“Let’s go on a half-day canoe trip together, Adam. Something local. I’ll meet you at the river.”

On the trip, we almost killed each other. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

“The mindset that improv training breeds is kind, empathetic, resourceful, observant, responsive, innovative, and resilient. Imagine for a moment that every boss you’ve ever had, every coworker, everyone who has ever reported to you was kind, empathetic, resourceful, observant, responsive, innovative, and resilient. Imagine what you could have accomplished together.”

Adventure:

We met relatively early in the morning at a gas station. He followed me in his car to the downriver site where we’d end our morning’s paddle. And then, we drove my car to the upriver site where we put the canoe in the water. After a couple of hours of pleasant, enjoyable calm flat water, punctuated by the occasional mild, short, fun rapids, we came to a bigger rapid, and pulled the boat to the bank to reconnoiter.

I hopped out, scrambled a ways down the bank, climbed up on some rocks and debris, and scoped out the rapid. It was fast, turbulent water, but the chute through the rapid was uncomplicated and clear of any major obstacles. I nodded, returned to Adam, and said, “Let’s do this.”

He replied, “I don’t know.”

“I think we can do it,” I said. “Bigger, but not harder, than what we’ve already done.”

Then I reminded him of a few key techniques for navigating the rapid successfully and what to do if we capsized (I was the experienced paddler in the boat), and we pushed off the bank.

The first half of the rapid was a thrilling, easy, straight shot. We came to the first of two slight adjustments we’d have to make before reaching calm water again, and Adam leaned right when he should have leaned left. We took on water. The boat rode lower, and within one second we were capsized. For a few seconds, I shouted instructions to Adam. “Hang onto your paddle! Feet downstream! See you at the bottom! Left bank!” Neither one of us knows if he heard any of that.

Disaster:

The next thing I knew, my ankle got caught between two boulders. I swung around head downstream, foot pinned, face up in the heavy water. And the torrent played me like a ragdoll. I could not free my ankle. I struggled to keep my face above the water. By trying to sit up, I could just manage to bring my face to the surface long enough to gasp a breath. I did this a few times. I hadn’t been pinned more than a few seconds, I think, but I was already becoming exhausted.

If I couldn’t free my foot, I would drown very soon. But struggling as I was to earn just three breaths, I was losing strength, and hadn’t made any progress toward freedom. I thought, “I’m going to die.” I thought of my unborn daughter growing up without a dad. So I took a breath, and gave in to the torrent. I went limp. My body did a horizontal impression of a car-dealership tube-man in the current.

I was resting.

After only a couple of seconds of that, I summoned my strength and did the hardest situp of my life. I managed the biggest breath so far, and — finally — to wrench my ankle from between the boulders that held it.

Seconds later, the rapids spit me out into the calm but swift water below. I thought, for the first time since being pinned, of Adam. I hoped he’d fared better than I had. I hoped too that he’d heard me say left bank. I swam for that bank myself, exhausted.

By coincidence or by design, Adam had also found the left bank. We found each other, and took stock.

Our paddles were gone. Our boat was gone. Adam had seen it destroy itself against a rock, turning inside out and wrapping around the boulder under the immense pressure of the water. Our food was gone. Hats gone. Almost everything was gone. Drinking water, gone. Adam’s shoes, gone.

I still had my wallet. Still had my keys. Both of us, somehow, had managed to keep our smartphones, and to keep them dry.

The phones turned on, but there was no reception. So we climbed a small but steep hill beside the river.We were somewhere inside Fort Lewis Army Base, and there were no buildings, or paths or other man-made anythings to be seen, even from the hill. The bank was impassable. The river too swift and cold to float the afternoon in. And we could not place a call. Google maps did, however, give us some slight indication of our location and of directions. We identified a possible road on the map and planned to walk there. It was not very near.

Adam’s shoes were gone, and his bare feet already hurt after the small amount of walking we’d done. I gave him my sandals and went barefoot.

Ordeal:

We tried to walk in the direction of the road or path that the map had indicated. It wasn’t easy to do. The forest around us was all but impenetrable. Every foot of progress was hard won through undergrowth and brambles. We zigzagged our way in the general direction we wanted to go by walking along fallen logs whenever we could. They provided paths through the bramble.

The afternoon became hot, and we wished we had water. We became quite fatigued. The landscape of small hills and valleys was difficult. The bramble nearly impossible.

Eventually, we reached my wife by phone and tried to describe the spot we were trying to reach — and told her it was within Fort Lewis. Could she call someone to meet us there — or try to meet us there herself?

We lost reception.

When we regained reception, we learned she’d gotten permission to drive into this remote section of the base to try to find us.

We pushed on. I lost my wallet, and spent some time and energy looking for it, retracing my steps a small distance. I could not tell where I had been, could not see my own path, so I gave up on my wallet, and we pressed on again.

Finally, we came in to a valley we believed our road ran along. But there was no road. So we pressed on, until…

Salvation:

I don’t know whether I saw or heard her first. Bless her, my wife had found our road, driven along it as far as she could, and then, when the road became impassible to the car, she’d left the car to find us on foot. She’d brought water.

Rejuvenated, somewhat, by the arrival of our rescuer, and by the rehydration, we quickened our pace and reached the car.

With the worst of the ordeal behind me, I decided and told Adam, “Now that we’re safe, and only in retrospect, that was kind of fun.”

“Not my idea of fun,” said Adam (a guy who’s run the Tough Mudder because that is his idea of fun).

Retrospect:

That’s when something began to dawn on me. “Not my idea of fun,” was the most negative thing Adam had said all day.

We’d stood on the bank of that river, nearly drowned, already exhausted by the ordeal in the rapids, with no way back to civilization, without water, and facing hours of greater ordeal in the heat of the afternoon. Adam had leaned left when he should have leaned right. I’d taken us into a rapid that I should not have attempted with Adam’s level of experience and confidence. We stood there on the bank facing trouble, but not emergency.

There were lots of conversations we could have had on that bank. Either of us could have blamed the other, shouted, pointed, and cursed. Either of us could have sat on the bank to cry. Either of us could have begun to marshal resources to support his own comfort and ease — to hell with the other guy.

Instead, we took quick stock of the situation, and began to think of the two person unit. Adam was fitter physically. I was more experienced outdoors. I had sandals. Adam’s bare feet were already hurt.

We strategized briefly. And we took immediate action to get the pair of us out of the predicament.

And the day went that way, each of us caring for the other, filling in when we could for the other’s weaknesses.

There was not a moment’s time given to sniping or to blame. We spoke occasionally of the fatigue and the dehydration, but neither of us complained. Instead, we kept the team apprised unemotionally of our slowly deteriorating state of strength and endurance. We took a moment to admire the beauty of a striking caterpillar posing on a tree trunk.

We disagreed about strategy often. At those times, we debated briefly, and one of us would defer to the other, and get completely behind the plan from that point on. We made errors that set us back. We adjusted, and still never pointed fingers.

Revelation:

We had each other’s backs, and we were united behind a single purpose.

I’d been considering a company dedicated to making work good for people. I’d seen how much ineffectiveness there is in many people’s work habits, and how many people feel beat down by work instead of fulfilled. Most people in our society don’t like work. I wanted to make a difference in that because I wanted my daughter to grow up in a culture where work is viewed as a grace and a privilege. I knew that tools and techniques from theater improv could serve to help people focus on what matters, to respond to others with empathy and purpose, and to take inspiration from the most seemingly trivial things — and therefore to like work.

Because Adam is the best improviser I know, I’d thought about asking him to join me in founding this company.

But it was because of who we were together in adversity, because of our focus on purpose, our willingness to keep going when it seemed we could not, because of the resourcefulness and commitment to purpose and team above all else… Because of those extraordinary qualities proven in a true trial of our temperaments, I knew two things.

Company Born:

First, I knew Adam was someone I could work with in the trenches. Come hell or high water, we’d be able to weather the rough seas of a startup.

Second, I knew that it was the improviser’s mentality that allowed us to maintain such equanimity, kindness, and resolve during and after such a trial. I knew we had something we could offer to the workplaces and to working-teams all over our country. And I knew we were already both experienced at teaching it.

Pair that with a life-long passion for developing leadership in myself and others… We were poised to change lives. We asked Rachel (who shares our mindset and devotion to developing it still further) to join us. She rounded out our team, and we started changing the world of work one team at a time.

Our Impact:

The mindset that improv training breeds is kind, empathetic, resourceful, observant, responsive, innovative, and resilient. Imagine for a moment that every boss you’ve ever had, every coworker, everyone who has ever reported to you was kind, empathetic, resourceful, observant, responsive, innovative, and resilient. Imagine what you could have accomplished together. Imagine the joy that would have filled your days. Imagine how you would feel on Monday morning, knowing you were heading to work to be surrounded by minds like that.

That’s why I have found my life’s work in changing lives, by changing work, by changing habits, by teaching improv dynamically correlated to the work you do.

 


"Culture Fitness" with Rebecca Clements - MGW #6

GUEST: Vice President of Human Resources at Moz, Rebecca Clements  https://moz.com/about/team/rebeccadclements

Rebecca Clements on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebecca-clements

 

Human Resources’ reputation as being pain-in-the-butt rule-makers and rule-enforcers was a leading reason Rebecca Clements chose to cultivate a different kind of HR experience.

In this episode, Rebecca talks about the imperative of good culture in tech in order to attract and maintain talent from diverse backgrounds of experience.  And she tells us how she and her team do it?

“Culture is something that happens around you unless you are really intentional about it.

If you are intentional and use it as an advantage within the business, then all of your time spent on it will be worth while and set you apart from your competitors, attract people, and help your business be successful.”

What makes a company “culturally fit?”

  1. Clearly articulated values that everyone in the company embraces, wants to be a part of and upholds.
  2. Intentionality about how priorities are managed.
  3. Treat people well ? clients and co-workers. How you treat one will bleed into your behavior with the other.

She generously shares Moz’s value system called TAGFEE that every Mozzer aspires to daily.

 

Transparent:  Be willing to talk about it all: the good, bad, and ugly.  They have a commitment to share what didn’t work, without making excuses.

Authentic:  Bring your BEST authentic self to work.  People bring and share their stories.  They share at Lunch & Learns to offer personal insight.  They are encouraged to speak up and bring their set of experiences to the table.  Active disagreement is vital and encouraged in order to have all opinions authentically on the table.

Generous:  The company provides paid-paid vacations for employees and sabbaticals for employees after 5 years.  Considering the “Whole Human”.  They match charity donations. They demonstrate a generous mindset by being available with time, information and coaching/guidance.

Fun:  Positivity- assume good intent, “You have my best interest at heart and I have yours.”  They actively invest in team-building and building community.

Empathetic:  Empathy is key to decision making and solving conflict.  They seek to employ empathetic people to increase the quality of the work environment.  They talk about it, model it and celebrate empathy in their workplace.

Exceptional:  Being willing to choose unique, value-based marketing strategies or “give-aways”.  Offering professional coaching to all of their employees to help them through challenges and opportunities.   Anyone can pursue coaching for any reason at all.  They  know that if you are dealing with something at home or in the office, it will affect your work.  Offering ongoing manager courses for all levels of management or aspiring management to gain skills.

Yes, they even have a Team Happy:  Rebecca leads a team of 5 people at Moz whose mission it is to ensure happiness, productivity and to embody TAGFEE.

 

And, YES, they are hiring.  https://moz.com/about/jobs#listings

 

And, YES, they have an annual marketing conference called MOZCON coming up this fall September 12-14.  Get your tickets here https://moz.com/mozcon

 

Visit Mighty Good Work and The Yes Works at: TheYesWorks.com

Theme music by: Miguel Juarez

Midshow break music by : Allan Loucks www.TinEar.com

Check out this episode!


Never Say This In Customer Service

(Mind you, we’re all — yes, all — in customer service.)

esterday, I was on the phone with a company that’s been giving me the run around for way too long. Normally, I’d have taken my business elsewhere. But, because it’s my father-in-law’s health insurance, and part of his pension, I was locked in.

For years, I’ve been facing terrible customer service from this company. Multiple customer service “pros” have been failing to meet their company’s obligations. Finally, during yesterday’s call, I found myself speaking with a supervisor who knew how customer service was done. Carrie (the supervisor) was guaranteeing me this, and apologizing for that. She empathized with me about the long-standing problems I’d been having. She called the experience I’d had so far, “unacceptable.”

Things on the call with her were going well until I asked to be refunded for $40 of prescriptions I’d had to pay out-of-pocket because of her company’s failures. “I don’t have the receipt,” I admitted. Carrie was happy to offer a refund, but understandably needed the receipt to do so. Accounting will be accounting.

And then she said what no person in customer service should ever say.

“There’s nothing I can do.”

If I’m your customer, “There’s nothing I can do,” is the absolute last thing I want to hear from you. I’m looking to you for service. Don’t balk. Find a way to serve. Maybe you don’t have the authority to do what I’m asking. Maybe you have the authority, but not the willingness. Either way, if you determine that there’s something you can do to help, if you only find it, you will find a way. Offer what you do have.

On the call I was describing, I momentarily felt my hopes — finally rekindled by the first responsible and reasonable professional I’d reached after a year’s struggle — dashed by the simple statement, “There’s nothing I can do.”

But, I considered what I’d come to know about Carrie in the past five minutes of excellent customer service. I reached down deep and gathered what was left of my trust, and said, “Carrie.” (I’ve changed her name.) “Carrie, please don’t say that. After the experience I’ve had with your company, I don’t want you to say that there’s nothing you can do.”

She said, “I wish there was. You haven’t been getting the service you deserve. I’d like to give you a refund. I really would. But I’d need a receipt.”

“Thank you, Carrie,” I said. “Here’s what you can offer. I spend $10 with you every month on medications. You can take my word that the refund would be about $40, and you can offer me a credit for the next four months of purchases. You wouldn’t need a receipt to offer me that. Heck, you could offer me that credit simply for the inconvenience and hassle your company has been putting me through on a regular basis for years.”

“We could do that,” she said. She sounded relieved. I’d broken the fear that had caused her to balk. “I’ll credit your account $40.”

It’s Not True. It Degrades Trust.

Guess what. When you say, “There’s nothing I can do,” no one ever believes you. It’s the refuge of the frightened, the lazy, and the powerless.

When you or someone on your team says, “There’s nothing I can do,” your customer’s hopes are crushed, and they start to wish they’d never engaged with your company.

Whatever the reason you’re telling your customer, “I can’t help,” you’re shattering their trust and losing their respect.

Customer Service Alternatives

“I’m not going to do that,” preserves more trust and respect than, “I can’t.”

By saying, “I’m not going to,” you are naming a choice. I may not agree with that choice. I may not like it. But at least you’re being honest and courageous by giving it to me straight.

Better still, if you can’t or won’t do what your customer is asking, then ask yourself, “What can I do? What will I do?”

  • I can’t give you a refund, but I will give you credit.
  • I can ask my supervisor.
  • I don’t know the answer to that question, but I will investigate and call you within the hour to give you the answer.

Happy Side Effect

So, a practice of finding what you CAN do when you can’t or won’t do what a customer (or a colleague) is asking vastly improves customer experience. It can make the difference between losing a client and wowing a client.

It also improves employee experience and employee engagement. None of us likes feeling powerless. When we say we’re powerless, we feel powerless. Look for the power you have, find creative solutions, and you’ll feel powerful.

HEY, POLICY MAKERS!

Meanwhile, employers, give your employees all the authority they need to satisfy the majority of customer complaints. Your customers will be happy. Your employees will be happy, and engaged, and will stay on the job. And you’ll find you’re swimming in loyalty from both customers and employees.

 

 

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Imagine your team operating with high-level EQ. Trouble is, reading an article doesn’t reliably change behavior. That’s why we created Adeptability Training for your team for a high-performance accountability culture that’s fun and fulfilling to work in. Want an Adeptable team?

Book a call today.


"Storied Leadership" with Jody Maberry - MGW #5

GUEST: Jody Maberry — http://jodymaberry.com/

Jody Maberry on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodymaberry

Jody Maberry Show (podcast): https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/jody-maberry-show-helping/id1084178356?mt=2

Our stories are what set us apart. Your story is not the same as anyone else’s, and that gives you the power to connect, intrigue, and inspire others.

 

Some of us think we don’t have good stories, and wouldn’t know how to tell them if we did. “Good stories come to people who can tell them. When you look at life as a storyteller, you will find stories in nearly everything.” And with practice, and by tuning in to your audience, you can become good at it.

 

Why tell stories? Stories stick with people. They’re memorable. And, stories tie things together. Innovation results from tying unexpected things together. So, stories lead to innovation.

 

Whether you’re expert in a given field or not, your experience has something to offer to those who are. Innovation in a field often comes from the connections made by novices and outsiders.

 

People aren’t motivated at work just by the paycheck and benefits package. That’s just the fuel that allows them to spend their time in your organization instead of hunting and gathering. People are motivated to do extraordinary work by a fulfilling story. Story creates identity and satisfaction at work. Every business (as Disney says) is putting on a show. Story creates the roles for people. As employers, we can create an environment where the storytelling is about the value of the work you do, and how fulfilling the work you do can be.

 

Every story you tell informs every action we take. Change the story, change the experience. Each of us needs to be the hero of the story we’re in. Leaders can inspire and motivate those they lead by weaving a story in which everyone plays a critical role in achieving a goal that matters.

 

Our clients and customers are the heros of their stories as well. To serve them well, we must help them through the obstacles they face in their journey.

 

Be alert to the stories your company is telling, even when you are not speaking. Every aspect of your brand and behavior tells a story.

 

——

 

Visit Mighty Good Work and The Yes Works at: www.TheYesWorks.com

 

Theme music by: Miguel Juarez

Midshow break music by : Allan Loucks www.TinEar.com

Check out this episode!


Your Happiness, Your Job with Dana Manciagli - MGW #4

GUEST: Dana Manciagli — Global Career Expert: Speaker and Private Coach

www.DanaManciagli.com

https://www.linkedin.com/in/danamanciagli

 

Over decades, Dana Manciagli amassed skills and insights into good work and career wisdom while working at such companies as Avery, SeaLand, Kodak and Microsoft. Now, she gives others the benefit of that wisdom as  an author, blogger, keynote speaker, career coach, and global career expert.

Earlier episodes of this podcast have focused on leadership’s role in great work in our companies. Dana Manciagli is here to talk with your host Aaron Schmookler about what each of us can do to insure that we’ve got Mighty Good Work.Reboot yourself by changing jobs, by jumping division to division, location to location, or company to company.

 

Here are a few highlights from our conversation with Dana:

 

Make choices! Don’t let your work happen to you. Be deliberate.

 

Figure out what you like, and pursue only what you like.


You can’t be all things to all people. Make choices. Sometimes they’re tough. You don’t have to get it absolutely right. Make a call and take action on it.

 

“What are you waiting for? You have a vision. You know what you want to do next. Why aren’t you doing it?”

 

Don’t rely on your boss to make you happy.

 

Ask yourself, “What was this week like? Did I do my best? Treat my people well? Make good choices?” Take regular accounting of your own performance against your own standards of excellence. Expect greatness.

 

There’s a lot of boss bashing out there. Stop bashing the boss. It only hurts your career.

 

Business revolves around relationships.

 

Rule #1: Build the relationship with your boss. There’s a “we factor” and you’re role in the relationship is equally important. It takes two.

 

YOU have tremendous power in yourself — through your choices — to have good work wherever you are.

 

Put in the work that it takes to enjoy work! Don’t be stuck.Take action to get to joy at work!

 

If you need a private job search coach, contact Dana through her website or through LInkedIn.

 

http://DanaManciagli.com

https://www.linkedin.com/in/danamanciagli
Check out this episode!


Company Culture By Design

Company Culture Blueprint

Company culture ain’t a list on the wall. It ain’t platitudes spoken at team meetings. Company culture ain’t even a prevailing attitude that everyone on payroll adopts after they’ve drunk the company Kool-Aid.

“Want to create a productive, lucrative, and personally rewarding culture in your company? You can. Create the contagion.”

Gotta Understand What Company Culture Is

So what is it?

Company culture is the set of contagious behaviors and attitudes shared among the people on your team (and reflected in your clients and vendors as well).

It’s a system of beliefs and behaviors instilled into the zeitgeist of your company. Everybody’s doing it and steeped in it. The indoctrination began during recruiting. Culture is shaped by the stories we tell within a community. It’s the behaviors that have become habitual and automatic. Culture’s details are selected by reinforcement and by disincentives and by benign neglect. Company culture is the behaviors that people exhibit even when the heat is on, they’re under stress, and people are getting under their skin. And company culture can be shaped. It can be changed. It can be trained.

But it can’t be memo-ed. And it can’t be policied. And it can’t be employee handbooked. It is profoundly influenced by behaviors in the C-Suite. But, Company culture is not simply a top-down thing. It’s an all around thing. Think the C-Suite can’t have it’s culture slowly changed from the bottom? Think again. Culture, by its very nature, is definitively contagious. Think of a Grateful Dead show. Imagine Burning Man. Think of a Donald Trump Rally. The people in those environments don’t behave that way — for better or for worse — at home. They get swept up in a powerfully contagious culture wave. That wave is influenced by the behaviors and the stories that surround them.

Sold?

Want to create a productive, lucrative, and personally rewarding culture in your company? You can. Create the contagion. Behavior is contagious. Belief is contagious. Any person at any level can introduce a new contagion. Don’t believe me? What phrase or figure of speech do you use now, but that you didn’t before a co-worker started saying it in your presence. What stories are told in the break room that have you and your colleagues nodding or cheering? That’s an illustration of the contagion of culture.

Gotta Know What to Do

What are the behaviors that lead to a productive, lucrative and personally rewarding culture? Here are some:

  • Give feedback to your direct reports and peers that is:
    • Frequent
    • Specific.
    • Timely
    • Organic
    • Compassionate
    • Heavily congratulatory
    • Corrective when needed
    • Focused on the future
  • Contribute thoughts and ideas freely.
  • Respond to others thoughts and ideas by furthering the discussion (never shooting down).
  • Focus on purpose and on actions that need taking.
  • Observe and inquire about the non-verbal cues of others for greater clarity and communication success.
  • Observe and choose your own non-verbal communication for greater clarity and communication success.
  • Offer solutions, not complaints.
  • Welcome change while respecting tradition.
  • Speak about clients and coworkers with compassion and appreciation.
  • Replace time wasting conflict between people over who is right with effective conflict between ideas so the best ideas are found and forged.
  • Tell stories that cast others in a good light, and in which you are not a victim of circumstance.
  • Manage and supervise in ways that help your people manage fear — to feel less fear, and to act with freedom in the face of fear. We call this a “Got-Your-Back Culture.”

More than the sum

These are the behaviors that awaken the elusive SYNERGY we hear so much about. Synergy is not a mythical unicorn or a woo-woo concept from beyond the pale. Synergy is real. We’ve all experienced it.   And, it’s attainable. One way to get it… the skills and techniques of Adeptability Training correlated to the work you do.

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As G.I. Joe used to tell me at the end of each episode… “Knowing is half the battle.” The gap between what your people know, and what they do… fear. If you’d like to build fear-busting Adeptability culture in your company, click to book a call.