Connection Information

To perform the requested action, WordPress needs to access your web server. Please enter your FTP credentials to proceed. If you do not remember your credentials, you should contact your web host.

Connection Type

 In Business


Today, a departure from our usual format. Instead of host, today I’m the guest on another podcast. The host of the “Go Time” podcast, Greg Towne of Greg Towne Training invited me to be his guest. I enjoyed the conversation so much that we’ve decided to share it with you.

 

Today, instead of the interviewer, I’m the interviewed. And I’ll be talking about what makes for effective training, why accountability is not a  burden, but a great grace, and the way having a kid has shaped my career.

 

Thanks to Greg and Go Time for having me on their show, and allowing us to share our conversation with you.

 

Dreading failure leads to mediocrity.

 

Celebrating failure can make you less self-conscious, more flexible in thinking, and more willing to take risks.

 

“I can’t” and “That’s not my personality.” are crutches to protect us from facing fear. They help us feel safe. And they prevent us from being effective. It’s not necessary to rip those crutches out of people’s hands. Whatever people (yourself included) throw your way to excuse a lack of accountability, simply deny the applicability of the crutch. And insist gently but firmly on performance.

 

Taking unreasonable accountability for reaching your goals and performing exceptionally gives you access to success. Gives your people access to success.

 

Any success without unreasonable accountability is luck.

 

Asking for help is called employing resources. If you’re not using resources at your disposal because of pride, you’re cheating yourself (and your organization) out of success potential. And there’s no lost pride. It’s just smart. It’s resource management.

 

I speak about a client’s success in turning things around on his team. Here’s a link to a case study.

 

Training that’s information transfer is ineffective because people go into auto-pilot, especially under stress. When training is habit-forming, it creates change, even in people who may be reluctant or resistant trainees.

 

Work is more and more about experience, community, affinity. Work is more and more the place where we get those things, instead of other gathering places of communities in the past.

Work is built on relationship. The stronger the relationships, the stronger the work.

 

Accountability can be a pleasure — when you’re striving to perpetually become better.

 

Perfection is impossible to reach Striving is worthwhile. It’s enlivening. It gets people up in the morning to go to work. It’s uncomfortable, but rewarding.

 

“That’s just the way things are,” “That’s not me,” “We’ve always done it this way?” Those phrases are a death knell.

 

Comfort and complacency are tempting, but boring.

 

Managers, supervisors, leaders who invite and inspire us into the roller-coaster of striving are the people whom we most appreciate.

 

Thanks again to Greg Towne for hosting me, and for allowing me to share our conversation with you.

 

http://www.gregttraining.com/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/gregtowne/
Check out this episode!

Recent Posts

Start typing and press Enter to search